Announcing “Forge Your Future With Open Source”: The first book to detail how to contribute to open source projects

Ever wanted to contribute to free and open source software but didn’t know how? You’re in luck! There’s now a book on the subject, and I’m honored to be its author.

It all started in Spring 2017 when I received a message from my friend (and now editor!), Brian: “Hey, did you know there isn’t a book on how to contribute to open source?”

I’d just left HPE to start freelancing, so the timing was good for me to take on this big project as well. Writing was slowed a little by my busy travel schedule, but now we’re finally ready to share the book with the world.

Q: When will it be available?
A: The beta eBook is available RIGHT NOW. We anticipate the hard copy will be out in June.

Q: Beta eBook? What’s that?
A: Beta eBooks are early releases. These books are works-in-progress, but when released have more than enough content to be useful. People who buy the beta book will receive frequent updates as new content is added and also receive the final ebook when that’s available. Beta purchasers also get the chance to provide feedback on the book before it’s released in hard copy.

Q: Why Pragmatic Bookshelf?
A: Partly because they asked me, but mostly because it gave me the chance to work with my friend Brian. However after working with the Pragmatic team for a few months now I see they’re all just as great as Brian is, so I’m happy to be a member of the Pragmatic author family.

Q: There’s probably a reason this book wasn’t written before now, you know.
A: Yes: A lot of experienced open source contributors get the “I did it the hard way, and so should you, kid” chip on their shoulder and can’t seem to lose it. That’s worked against us for decades, as thousands of potential contributors walked away discouraged.

Q: OK, so, what will you cover? I mean, it’s not like there’s One True Way to contribute.
A: You’re so right! Distilling nearly forty years of free and open source contributions into a single set of best practices that can apply to most projects is a challenge. Thankfully the years I’ve spent as an Open Source Advocate Without Portfolio (helping maintainers and organisers of all projects) makes this possible. The book covers the background and history of free and open source, tribal knowledge that trips up new contributors, how to find a project to contribute to, how to contribute for your job, and so much more.

Very importantly, THIS BOOK DOES NOT FOCUS SOLELY ON PROGRAMMING CONTRIBUTIONS. Instead, it addresses documentation, design, and all forms of contributing (including, of course, programming). There’s room (and a need for) everyone in free and open source software.

You should definitely go buy it now then leave feedback which will help improve it for future readers. You’ll be a part of what makes free and open source so great.